Xiage’s yangong deity shrine

David Leffman Uncategorized Leave a Comment

I took this photo in 2010 at Yangong Ci (檐公祠), a wayside shrine in the Dong hamlet of Xiage, two kilometres uphill from the popular wooden village of Zhaoxing (肇兴). Yangong Ci translates literally as “Lord Eave’s Ancestral Shrine”, but yangong is in fact a Chinese transliteration of the Dong term for something like “home of the venerable grandfather”. The …

Feathers, Fakes and Fees

David Leffman Antiques, Fakes Leave a Comment

I’m no expert in Chinese antiques, but I have spent a lot of time browsing antiques markets all over the country, looking at everything from old woodblock prints to iron cannon and pieces of nineteenth-century official regalia. These include rank decorations such as “hat buttons” (maoding, 帽顶), a coloured bead mounted on top of an official’s headgear, and “mandarin squares” …

A Japanese Map of Qing China

David Leffman map, Uncategorized Leave a Comment

A while back I bought this map of China, hand-drawn in ink, from a dealer in Japan. Other things also point to it being a Japanese-made map: the translucent, resilient paper, typical of Japanese manufacture; an emphasis on marked routes from Japan (a country that China showed little interest in until recent times); and the general style, similar to Japanese …

Mesny in the Shanghai Evening Courier

David Leffman Mesny, Miao Leave a Comment

In 1868 Mesny landed a job of arms instructor with the Sichuan Army, and went off to Guizhou province to fight against ethnic Miao rebels. He spent much of the next two years around the town of Chong’an in southeastern Guizhou, teaching the Chinese soldiers how to use modern firearms and field guns, fighting in several battles, and watching the …

Mesny in China’s Millions

David Leffman Mesny, Miao, Miao War Leave a Comment

On 19 February 1877, British missionaries Charles Judd (Zhu Mingyang, 祝名扬) and James Broumton (Ba Zicheng, 巴子成) arrived at Guiyang, capital of Guizhou province, to establish the city’s first Protestant outpost. They recorded their impressions of the city – including their welcome from Mesny – in China’s Millions, journal of the China Inland Mission. On their way to Guiyang, Judd …

Miao embroideries

David Leffman Miao, Uncategorized Leave a Comment

Southwestern China’s Guizhou province is home to the Miao (Hmong), an ethnic minority who originated a thousand miles away in the Yellow River valley and migrated here millennia ago after being chased out of their homelands by the Yellow Emperor, ancestor of the Chinese people. Miao from different regions of Guizhou have developed their own distinct dress patterns. Both men …

China’s First Rollercoaster

David Leffman Mesny, Uncategorized Leave a Comment

During the late 1880s, a new craze swept foreign colonies in southeast Asia. Switchback railways – an embryonic form of rollercoaster – had appeared in the Philippines, Japan, Singapore, Java and Hong Kong, and were raking in huge profits (well, except for Hong Kong’s, which somehow managed to go bankrupt within a year). In 1890 a French consortium, led by …

A True View of Sichuan

David Leffman Uncategorized 4 Comments

Back in March I made quick trips to the Chinese woodblock printing centres of Zhuxian (Henan), Wuqiang (Hebei) and Foshan (Guangdong), partly to get some idea of the current state of this folk art. Of course I took the opportunity to stock up on prints too… Asking at a shop outside the Wuqiang Woodblock Printing Museum if they had any …

Summoning the Dragon

David Leffman Miao, Uncategorized 5 Comments

Summoning the Dragon (召龙节) is a male-only celebration held every twelve years at Miao villages in the Leigong Shan region of southeastern Guizhou. The ceremony is usually closed to outsiders but in March 2019 a friend managed to wrangle special permission for me to attend the event at Xiao Kaitun in Yongle county (永乐镇小开屯村) – though have to say that …